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Wednesday, November 18, 2020 | History

1 edition of A commentary on Catullus found in the catalog.

A commentary on Catullus

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Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Réimpr. de l"édition de Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1876.

StatementRobinson Ellis
The Physical Object
Format[Texte imprimé] /
Pagination1 vol. (lxxiii-400 p.)
Number of Pages400
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL27025094M
ISBN 101108012744
ISBN 109781108012744
OCLC/WorldCa758944570

The Translation of Catullus’ Poem by Kyle Pope INTRODUCTION Poem number one hundred and one by the Roman poet Gaius Valerius Catullus is an inti-mate glimpse into a side of Catullus that is easy to overlook. Unlike the mass of his work which demonstrates his introspective obsession with Lesbia or his biting and sarcastic stabs at those who. Carmen, or Poem, 64 is the longest of Catullus’ poems and focuses on mythological themes rather than daily life as does much of his poetry is typically identified as an epyllion, not unlike Callimachus’ is very short, relies heavily on the erudition of the reader to convey its meaning, and focuses more on the female helper-maiden than the male hero.


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A commentary on Catullus by Robinson Ellis Download PDF EPUB FB2

There are dozens of editions of Catullus, including at least two by Goold--but these two editions have quite different purposes. The Loeb edition has parallel texts, Latin and English, but no commentary. The advertised volume (ISBN ) is heavier on commentary and by: 1.

the translation itself strikes a perfect balance, to my taste, of the literal Latin, Catullus's meaning and intent, and elegance (without stuffiness or A commentary on Catullus book.

if you are going to buy only one book of Catullus's poems, or are thinking about adding to your collection of them, this is the one to get/5(16). Other editions containing works of Catullus [Gaius Valerius Catullus] Oxford World's Classics: Catullus: The Complete Poems.

Guy Lee () Oxford Classical Texts: C. Valerii Catulli: Carmina. Mynors (). Catullus invented the "angry love poem." Gaius Valerius Catullus (ca.

84 BC – ca. 54 BC) was a Roman poet of the 1st century BC. His surviving works are still read widely, and continue to influence poetry and other forms of art/5. That said, Fordyce's commentary is the go-to guide for all students of Catullus.

His commentary and insight are essential to understanding Catullus in the context of the late Republic and vis-a-vis Catullus' contemporaries. I have taken AP Latin Literature and I also recommend the AP Catullus book /5(3).

This work is the magisterial commentary by the Oxford scholar Robinson Ellis (–) on the life and oeuvre of the Roman poet Catullus, whose work illuminates the Cited by: This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. A commentary on Catullus by Ellis, Robinson, Publication date Topics Catullus, Gaius Valerius Publisher Oxford: Clarendon press Collection cdl; americana Digitizing sponsor MSN Contributor University of California Libraries Language English.

Addeddate Bookplateleaf 4 Call number SRLF:LAGEPages:   A commentary on Catullus by Robinson Ellis. Paperback $ View All Available Formats & Editions. So that the book is never forgotten we have represented this book in a print format as the same form as it was originally first published.

Hence any marks or annotations seen are left intentionally to preserve its true : Cambridge University Press. The year of his birth and that of his death are stated by Jerome in his edition of the Chronicles of Eusebius, probably on the authority of the De Poetis of date of the year of Abraham (= B.C.

87) Jerome says, “ Gaius Valerius Catullus scriptor lyricus Veronae nascitur ”, and under that ofor, according to some MSS., (= B.C. 57,or 58), he says, Jerome. Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Ellis, Robinson, Commentary on Catullus.

Hildesheim: Olms, Catullus has books on Goodreads with ratings. Catullus’s most popular book is The Complete Poems. a commentary on catullus Originally published in This volume from the Cornell University Library's print collections was scanned on an APT BookScan and converted to /5(2).

[19] tum: Catullus represents this as the first meeting of Peleus and Thetis; but, according to ApolloniusPeleus, though an Argonaut, was long since married; while Val.

Flacc. represents the wedding of Peleus and Thetis as pictured among the adornments of the Argo itself, and Achilles as brought by Chiron to bid his father good-by. This A commentary on Catullus book contains a major revision of Douglas Thomson's Catullus: A Critical Edition (), with the addition of a full commentary and a wholly new introduction.

For the introduction and for each of the poems there is an extensive and current bibliography. In the introduction, apart from sections on the life of Catullus, on the arrangement of the poems, and on their literary background 5/5(1). Commentary on Catullus.

Oxford, Clarendon Press, (OCoLC) Named Person: Gaius Valerius Catullus; Gaius Valerius Catullus; Gaius Valerius Catullus; Gaius Valerius Catullus: Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors /.

An edition of Catullus with commentary. Alexander Guarinus took many of his ideas about the text of Catullus from his father Baptista, but surely not all: note inique me, not mentioned in the commentary, where Alexander has surely taken over Avantius’ conjecture, whose work he knew, witness ; and note alsowhere Alexander.

Catullus 1 is traditionally arranged first among the poems of the Roman poet Catullus, though it was not necessarily the first poem that he is dedicated to Cornelius Nepos, a historian and minor poet, though some consider Catullus's praise of Cornelius's history of the Italians to have been sarcastic.

The poem alternates between humility and a self-confident manner; Catullus calls. The Greek Callimachus is credited with the saying mega biblion mega kakon (“big book, big evil”), and his admirer Catullus seems to have taken this to heart.

None of the Roman poet’s. This work is the magisterial commentary by the Oxford scholar Robinson Ellis () on the life and oeuvre of the Roman poet Catullus, whose work illuminates the closing years of the Roman Republic.

Our knowledge of Catullus' life derives almost entirely from his own writings. Three manuscripts survive which contain a collection of poems that are ascribed to him, and all three date.

Great gods, an amazing, immortal book. That you sent, of course, to your Catullus, so he might immediately die, on the optimum day, in the Saturnalia.

No you won’t get away with this crime. Now when it’s light enough I’ll run to the copyists bookstalls, I’ll acquire. Ovid Finds His Muse. The poem begins with a metrical and generic joke. The poet was preparing to write epic poetry: his first word is the same as the first word of the Aeneid, and he would have continued writing in dactylic hexameter, except that apparently Cupid “stole a foot.” [].

1–2: Arma: a weighty and tradition-laden first word, coming after Vergil’s famous Arma virumque. The body of the poem, the middle 4 lines, is an explanation for the dedication; Catullus is dedicating the poems to Nepos because Nepos supported Catullus and because Catullus respects Nepos' work (and finds it similar to his own).

Garrison's The Student's Catullus might be just what you need, or perhaps more than you need, since the commentary is pitched at the intermediate level. I remember it being relatively helpful when I was going through Catullus for the first time.

His text reads for uncti, you could take it as a partitive genitive with quod, which is how the edition in usum Delphini seems to understand. Description: This edition of eighty of Catullus's poems is designed for use at school and university. The Latin text (taken from the Oxford Classical Text of Catullus edited by Sir Roger Mynors) is accompanied by an introduction on the life of Catullus, and a commentary which interprets the poems in the light of the most up-to-date scholarship.

Marilyn B. Skinner is professor of classics at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Her previous publications include Catullus’ Passer: The Arrangement of the Book of Polymetric Poems (), Catullus in Verona (), Vergil, Philodemus, and the Augustans (co-edited, ), and Sexuality in Greek and Roman Culture (Blackwell, ).

Catullus, Carmina 1: Cui dono lepidum novum libellum arido modo pumice expolitum. Corneli, tibi; namque tu solebas Meas esse aliquid putare nugas Iam tum cum ausus es unus Italorum Omne aevum tribus explicare chartis, doctis, Iuppiter, et laboriosis.

quare habe tibi quidquid hoc libelli qualecumque, quod, o patrona virgo, plus uno maneat perenne saeclo. “The poet Catullus, a bon vivant in the waning days of the Roman Republic, employed his verse to comment on society, friends, enemies and his own often scandalous personal life.

These new translations feature the poems in the original Latin on the obverse page.”—Washington Post Book World"Peter Green is an outstanding translator. COMMENTARY would do better to devote an article to a description of this pioneering school, which recently hosted Catholics and Protestants from Northern Ireland who came to Israel to learn about Neve Shalom’s innovative methods, than to publish an article on a poor and harmful two-year-old-book.

Mulroy’s lively, rhythmic translations of the poems are enhanced by an introduction and commentary that provide biographical and bibliographical information about Catullus, a history of his times, a discussion of the translations, and definitions and notes that ease the way for anyone who is Author: Catullus.

by Catullus. Poem 5 (Let Us Live, My Lesbia) by Catullus. Poem 7 (You Ask Me How Many Kisses) by Catullus. Poem 61 (O, Haunter of the Heliconian Mount) by Catullus. Carmen Ci.

by Catullus. Popular. Buy A commentary on Catullus by Ellis, Robinson from Amazon's Fiction Books Store. Everyday low prices on a huge range of new releases and classic fiction/5(2).

The Nisbet-Hubbard Commentary on Horace Odes 2 appeared in Now, some twenty-five years later, comes its worthy successor, edited by Robin Nisbet and a new collaborator, Niall Rudd. Anyone who engages seriously with this work will learn much about Horace and Latin poetry more generally, at both a microscopic and a macroscopic : Lindsay Watson.

Catullus and Cornelius belonged to a group of Romans were more focused on everyday life, love, living and perhaps a little satiric commentary, rather than being great statesmen, orators or politicians.

They were, if you will, a sort of little arts colony existing within the greater political structure of s: Written to become the standard college textbook as well as a comprehensive reference, the book includes a brief introduction setting forth the known facts about the poet's life and the character of his poems, a fresh recension of all poems, and a commentary in English on each poem, explaining difficult points of Latin, features of Catullus.

The Poems of Catullus and Tibullus, and the Vigil of Venus: A Literal Prose Translation with Notes by Walter K. Kelly, to Which Are Added the Metrical Versions of Lamb and Grainger and a Selection of.

Catullus. from: $   Catullus, who lived from about 84 to 54 BC, was one of ancient Rome's most gifted, versatile and passionate poets. Living at a time of radical social change at the end of the Roman Republic, he belonged to a group of young poets who embraced Hellenistic forms to forge a new literary style, the so-called 'neoterics'.This comprehensive edition includes the complete, unabridged and.

Catullus 7 is one of Catullus's poems to his Lesbia. This seems to have been written at a particularly passionate stage of the affair, as the poem has no negative connotations, or doubts, as in others.

A comprehensive reference, The Student’s Catullus includes the following features: A brief overview of Catullus’s life and artistic persona A fresh recension of all poems A commentary in English on each poem, explaining difficult points of Latin and salient aspects of Catullus’ artistry/5(9).

Free 2-day shipping. Buy Cambridge Library Collection: Classics: A Commentary on Catullus (Paperback) at nd: Robinson Ellis. Catullus lived in a culture where public torture was common. Public violence extended into sadistic forms of sex. The first part of Wiseman's book discusses these and other aspects of Roman life Author: Thomas D'evelyn.

Classics Students Publish a New Commentary on Catullus By In CAS News Aug Dr. Maria S. Marsilio, Professor of Classics, mentored eight Saint Joseph’s University students as they prepared and published a new Latin text commentary of Catullus, Carmina 3 in the Companion to the Worlds of Roman Women (edited by Ann R.

Raia and Judith. A Commentary on Catullus by Robinson Ellis,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(15).